Vocabulary and Grammar

Brazilian Portuguese vs European Portuguese

»Posted by on Feb 15, 2016 in Blog, Vocabulary and Grammar | 0 comments

Brazilian Portuguese vs European Portuguese

    Portuguese language was established as the official language of Brazil in 1758, but the strong indigenous and African presence had already produced important changes in the language. Later, in the 19th century, with mass immigration, mainly Germans, Japanese and Italians, a new change took place. Just to give you a picture, Italian influence in São Paulo is so strong that even our accent has changed. Other Portuguese colonies did not suffer the same influence. Therefore, the language spoken in Angola or Mozambique, for example, is much closer to the European Portuguese. But which language should you learn? Does it make a significant difference? Yes it does. Even a native Brazilian, finds it difficult to understand the pronunciation and part of the...

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Expression: “preço de banana”

»Posted by on Jan 20, 2016 in Blog, Vocabulary and Grammar | 0 comments

Expression: “preço de banana”

Banana is a very common fruit, always available and it’s also very cheap in Brazil. So when we want to say that something is cheap, we say  it has “preço de banana”. Exemplo: – Quanto custa isso? – Custa só vinte reais. Preço de banana!   Bananas grow in “bananeiras”. “Bananeiras” are so popular in Brazil that we have a song with this name. Listen and enjoy!...

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Verbs: the difference between “ser” and “estar”

»Posted by on Nov 7, 2015 in Blog, Vocabulary and Grammar | 0 comments

Verbs: the difference between “ser” and “estar”

    In some languages, (like English and French) there are not two verbs: “ser” and “estar” (to be). But the difference is quite simple. “Ser”: a permanent condition, innate, fixed, unchanging definition. “Estar”: a temporary condition, which can be changed, or a feeling. Exemplo 1: (ser) “Maria é bonita”. = Maria was born beautiful. (estar) “Maria está bonita”. = Maria is beautiful today. She is not always pretty.   Exemplo 2: (ser) “Eu sou brasileiro”. => I am brazilian, I was born in Brazil. It is a condition that does not change. (estar) “Eu estou no Brasil (hoje, agora)”. => I am in Brazil now, I was not in Brazil before. I will not be in...

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Expression: “Quem me dera…”

»Posted by on Oct 7, 2015 in Blog, Vocabulary and Grammar | 0 comments

Expression: “Quem me dera…”

    This is a very common expression in Brazil and you’ll hear it often: “Quem me dera…” (I wish …). It is used to express a desire, a dream. Usually seen as impossible or hard to get. Exemple:  – Quem me dera poder viajar pelo mundo! (I wish I could travel the world!) – Quem me dera ter coragem para dizer o que eu penso… (I wish I had the guts to say what I think … ) But it is also used without complement, as a confirmation of a desire. Exemplo: – Um dia você vai conseguir realizar esse sonho. (Someday you will accomplish that dream.) – Ah, quem me dera… ( Oh, I wish …) “Quem me dera” is used so often that is the title of many songs. Listen to “Ai, quem me...

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Expression: “Pode ser…”

»Posted by on Sep 18, 2015 in Blog, Vocabulary and Grammar | 0 comments

Expression: “Pode ser…”

  A very common expression in Brazil, it means: maybe, it’s possible, it might be. Exemplo 1: (meaning “yes”) – Você quer sair para jantar amanhã? / Do you wanna go out for dinner? – Pode ser. (Sim, eu quero sair amanhã / Yes, I’d like to go out to dinner tomorrow night)   Exemplo 2:  (meaning doubt) – Dizem que esse novo filme é muito bom. / People say it’s a good film. – Pode ser… (Pode ser bom, pode não ser. Eu não sei./ It might be good, it might be not. I don’t know.)   Exemplo 3: (negative) – Todo mundo vai gostar dessa novidade. / Everybody’s gonna like the news. – Pode ser que não… (Nem todos vão gostar. Algumas pessoas sim, outras não. / Not everybody...

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The numbers in Brazilian Portuguese

»Posted by on Jan 29, 2015 in Blog, Vocabulary and Grammar | 0 comments

The numbers in Brazilian Portuguese

Learn the first numbers in Portuguese watching the video .    

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